Article

How to Setup Subscriptions to Boost your Digital Publishing Business

Valeria Zaltur / 2022-11-30

Digital subscriptions and subscription-based business models are a growing trend in the media industry. While some digital publishing platforms are still trying to figure out content monetization, others have already established a subscriber base and revenue streams that can sustain their operations. This is mainly because of the changing consumer behavior and needs for high quality content, which is why it’s important for digital publishers to utilize this revenue stream. Contents: Start with a simple digital subscription Use subscriptions to boost loyalty, reduce churn and gather data Combine subscriptions with your other business models Use integrated payment and accounting systems Tracking Revenue Sources Subscriptions can help you grow your digital publishing business Conclusion 1. Start with a simple digital subscription A subscription is a payment that recurs over time, and the idea of signing up for a subscription is now one of the most popular ways for people to pay for products and services online. The benefits of subscriptions are many: Subscriptions are a great way to grow your business. As you offer more value through regular content updates, you'll attract loyal readers who will pay every month without fail (or at least they should). Subscriptions are a great way to boost loyalty and reduce churn. When customers have access to all your latest content in one place, they're less likely to cancel their subscription or stop reading altogether because they don't have enough content on hand! Subscriptions are a great way to gather data about your audience, which can help inform future decisions like what kinds of content should be created next or what kind of features might work best in this format. 2. Use subscriptions to boost loyalty, reduce churn and gather data Subscribing to relevant content is one of the best ways to keep your readers coming back for more. If you have a blog or website where people can subscribe to receive updates about new articles or ebooks, this is a good way for them to stay engaged with what you're doing and make sure they're up-to-date with everything happening in their industry or niche area of interest. You'll also be able to gain valuable insights into how many people are reading different parts of your site—and whether there's anything wrong with any part of it (or just specific sections). This knowledge will allow future improvements before they happen organically through organic traffic sources like SEO rankings; it also helps prevent issues from arising later down the line when it comes time for another redesign project! 3. Combine subscriptions with your other business models You should also consider combining subscriptions with other models and business lines. For example, you can offer a subscription to customers who buy your e-book. This is great for authors because it encourages readers to support them financially while allowing them to keep the rights to their work. Another way to combine subscriptions with other models involves adding more value through exclusive content or resources. If you create a blog that publishes articles related to your niche and include access codes within each post, then people are more likely to subscribe because they have something extra beyond what everyone else has access too! It's also possible that offering different types of content on a single platform could help attract new subscribers (and therefore generate additional revenue). 4. Use integrated payment and accounting systems Integrated systems are more secure because they're less likely to have vulnerabilities or bugs (and if they do, it's easy to fix). They're also easier for your customers to use and more cost-effective for you. Integrated systems are also more reliable than separate payment and accounting systems because they can handle unique situations like refunds or returns. And finally, integrated systems are more scalable—they can support many different payment methods and allow you to easily add new ones as needed. 5. Tracking Revenue Sources Spiny is the best tool for tracking your revenue sources. When you start using Spiny, we ask you to add all of your subscription prices and then let us know how many monthly subscribers you have. We track all of this information so that when a user signs up for a subscription on your site, we can assign them to the right plan with no manual updating required! We also let you track revenue sources like advertising and merch sales in addition to subscriptions. You can use this information to see what’s working well for your business so that you can focus on those areas moving forward. For example: if most of your traffic comes from Facebook ads but only 10% convert into paid customers compared with 40% coming from Google Adsense ads (which are free), it might be time to invest more money into Facebook ads or seek out other ways of monetization such as sponsored posts or affiliate links. Subscriptions can help you grow your digital publishing business Subscriptions are a great way to grow your business. It can generate recurring revenue, reduce churn and loyalty, help you gather data on your customers and allow you to offer multiple content streams in one place. Subscriptions can be combined with other business models like advertising or eCommerce sales to create a powerful presence that allows readers to become subscribers without being locked into any single platform. Integrating payments and accounting systems into subscriptions is also an excellent way of maintaining control over all aspects of managing products or services offered via subscription models such as SaaS (Software as a Service) businesses. Conclusion Subscriptions are a powerful tool for digital publishers, and we’ve highlighted four ways to use them in your business. By taking advantage of subscriptions, you can build loyalty among your readers and reduce churn by making it easy for them to renew their memberships. You can also gather data on the users who subscribe so that you can tailor content more effectively; plus they will be more likely to come back if they feel like they’re getting something out of their time spent with your company. Finally, combining subscriptions with other models like micro-payments or advertising will help keep revenues flowing even when there aren't many sales happening. To learn more about Spiny.ai services, sign up with email

Article

How to Manage a Network of Sites

Valeria Zaltur / 2022-11-23

As a publisher network owner, you have responsibilities to make sure that every part of your digital publishing business is operating at peak performance. This can be an overwhelming task when it comes to site management and operations. From collecting real-time analytics on individual sites to monitoring the overall health of your entire network, there's no shortage of stuff to do. Thankfully, Spiny has got your back—we built our platform with ease-of-use in mind so that even novice users can feel confident managing their sites from one place. Here are some tips for using Spiny! Contents: Analyzing publishing data Multiple sites to manage at once How Spiny can present this data all in one place The data "health" of your sites Conclusion Analyzing publishing data Once you have an analytics software like Spiny where you can access all your data, the next step is to set goals. If your goal is to improve conversion rates across the network of sites, then look at how the conversion rate varies between different types of pages and between different site locations (such as a country or region). If this information isn't enough for you, consider segmenting your data by date or time of day. For example: Look at how conversion rates vary between weekday and weekend traffic. Weekends often see higher conversion rates because people are usually more relaxed and can spend more time browsing around on websites. This also means that weekends may not be representative of overall visitorship though—you might want to look into weekday conversions too! Look at how conversion rates vary depending on the amount of time spent visiting each page in a session (e.g., 30 minutes vs 10 minutes). It might be that those who browse less tend to convert more often than those who browse for longer periods without converting; however if this isn't true then it's an interesting insight into visitor behavior! Multiple sites to manage at once If you're managing multiple sites, the first thing to consider is the number and type of your sites. The more sites you have, the more staff members will need training on them. It's also important that those responsible for creating content understand which departments should receive special attention based on specific factors like location or demographic groupings: Is there a particular store opening soon? Are new stores being discussed among executives higher up than yourself? Do these new initiatives require different types of content than before? If you’re not sure how to answer these questions, it may be time to talk to the people implementing your training program and that are setting goals for the business. It’s important that they understand what kind of content will be required at each stage of the process in order for your team members to create posts that are relevant and engaging. How Spiny can present this data all in one place A network of sites presents a unique challenge for any publisher: the data from each site is siloed and needs to be aggregated in order to understand performance holistically. At Spiny, we've built our solutions around this problem by creating a tool that can manage multiple sites simultaneously, pulling together information from all sources into one place. Spiny also allows you to monitor every facet of your business in real time, providing instant access to critical metrics such as revenue per user or content consumption patterns across all channels (mobile web, apps and desktop). Our AI-powered Recommendations feature recommends actions based on current performance so publishers can focus on content creation rather than gathering data or optimizing campaigns manually. The data "health" of your sites The data collected from your site should be used to improve your business. It is a valuable resource for understanding the performance of your content, SEO, and marketing efforts. Site health monitoring - Keeping an eye on the "health" of your website(s) is an important part of managing them effectively. The data you collect can help you identify problems with purchases, traffic spikes or dips, and even security issues. Content quality analysis - Understanding how different types of content perform, can help you make better decisions about what content needs to be written (or rewritten). Ideally, you'll want all kinds of content performing well—not just one kind that happens to fit into some specific niche category—but knowing what works best will help ensure that happens. Marketing optimization - You'll know which promotional tactics are working well (and which ones aren't), so you can adjust accordingly based on what type of results they're producing for each individual site as well as across all sites in general; this level-up process helps keep everything moving forward smoothly without breaking any links along the way! Conclusion In conclusion, the best way to manage a network of sites is by having all your data in one place where you can compare performance. For this you should use a software that is most fitting to your business and one that helps you identify opportunities and measure growth. This will allow you to analyze your sites much more easily and effectively than if you were stuck with just one interface for everything.

Article

How to Drive the Right Kinds of Users to your Site

Valeria Zaltur / 2022-10-31

If you want to build a successful site, it's important to understand your audience. Knowing who your users are and what they want will help you determine how best to serve them with content. It also helps when crafting a content strategy that resonates with them, which can lead to higher engagement, audience traffic and more conversions overall. Contents: Setting goals Understand your audience Developing personas and profiles Building a full suite of analytics Taking a more qualitative look at your users Create specific buyer personas to help you focus your content strategy Conclusion Setting goals You need to set goals for your website. What do you want? Why is the site important to you? You want a user-friendly, informative resource on the subject of [topic]. Your audience wants [purpose]. For example: "I want a blog that is easy for people to find and use." Understand your audience The most important thing to understand is your audience. You need to know who they are, what they want and how they want it. Understanding these things is key to creating engaging content that gets results. Spiny’s Publisher Intelligence makes it easy to define your editorial strategy based on the characteristics of your target readership. You can then create content that speaks directly to this audience—and only this audience—to drive engagement and build brand loyalty over time. Developing personas and profiles When it comes to building a website or developing your marketing strategy, you need to understand who your target audience is. But how do you go about figuring out who's going to be interested in what you do? The first step is creating personas based on real data about your ideal customer. Personas are fictional representations of the people who will visit and use your site, so they should be as detailed as possible (but not too specific). They should include things like: Name Age range Gender Location (city) and/or country/state/province/region/etc. Building a full suite of analytics The right analytics tools will help you understand your users, the experience they have on your site, and what they do before, during and after their visit. The more you know about them, the better equipped you'll be to attract the kind of visitors who are most likely to convert into paying customers. Analytics tools also give you insight into which marketing activities produce more conversions than others—and where you need to invest in more advanced strategies if those efforts aren't working as well as expected. For example, if tracking cookies show that a high percentage of visitors from one channel are signing up for a newsletter but not converting into paying customers or using an app or website feature frequently enough for it to make sense (i.e., their retention is low), then it's time for new tactics like retargeting ads on Facebook. In addition to looking at aggregate metrics like traffic, volume or conversion rates by traffic source over periods such as months or quarters under aggregate reports provided by tools like Spiny.ai's Publisher Intelligence, other areas within analytics platforms provide useful information: Content reports can tell us how many people viewed our homepage versus another page on our site; which content was most clicked on; what keywords were used when searching for us (or competitors); etc. Social media engagement includes all sorts of insights such as the number of likes/shares received across social channels; the number of clicks received via banner ads placed on these networks; impressions generated through video ads uploaded directly onto YouTube; etc. Taking a more qualitative look at your users To truly understand your users, you need to look at the qualitative side of things. What do your visitors expect? How can you make their experience more seamless? Tools like Spiny's Publisher Intelligence allow you to dig into this kind of data and help guide decisions that will take your site from good to great! Spiny’s Publisher Intelligence is an excellent tool that can help you track your audience and see what they are reading. It also helps you see what your competitors are doing, so you can build a strategy to target users who will be more likely to convert. Spiny’s Publisher Intelligence is an excellent tool that can help you track your audience and see what they are reading. It also helps you see what your competitors are doing, so you can build a strategy to target users who will be more likely to convert. Create specific buyer personas to help you focus your content strategy As mentioned previously, buyer personas are fictional characters that represent your ideal customers. These characters can help you to understand what your customers need and want, which will help you create better content, as well as ads that speak to the right people. There are several ways to go about creating buyer personas, but they should be based on real data that represents a significant enough portion of your audience—typically 5%-10%. When creating these profiles, ask yourself questions like: Who is this person? What do they do? Where do they live? How old are they? What other products have they purchased in the past (if any)? Conclusion Once you’ve identified your audience and their goals, the next step is to create content that meets them where they are. This means understanding not only what motivates them but also how they like to consume content. Finally, you can use tools like Spiny’s Publisher Intelligence to ensure that your content is being seen by as many people as possible. To learn more about Spiny, sign up by email.

Article

The Best Revenue Diversification Strategies for Digital Publishers

Valeria Zaltur / 2022-10-28

Contents: Ad revenues have plummeted, putting pressure on publishers to diversify their revenue streams and come up with new and creative ways to monetize their business The success of any strategy depends on the right measurements Tracking what is effective Analytics is the backbone of any meaningful strategy Maximize your current revenue streams Choose KPIs wisely when analysing your content performance after implementation of a new strategy; otherwise you may be making decisions that end up costing you money The challenge with data is that while it can provide insights, it needs the intelligence of the human mind to translate those insights into actions that will create value for the publisher A major challenge in optimizing content for monetization is determining which pieces of content actually bring in revenue A crucial breakthrough for publishers was the advent of native advertising, which is clearly separate from editorial content, does not interfere with user experience, and is geared specifically toward audiences most likely to convert into customers Publishers need solutions that integrate seamlessly with their existing tech stack, so they don't have to deal with multiple channels or even multiple systems within each channel If you want your revenue diversification strategies to be successful, you need analytics that can tell you what's working and what isn't working so you can improve your strategy as you go along Conclusion Tracking what is effective, optimizing content monetization, and determining which pieces of content actually bring in revenue can be challenging. This is especially difficult today where Ad revenue is plummeting and the war for attention is increasing. In this article we will look at some startegies to boost publisher revenue. Publishers solely relying on monetizing via ad revenue are having a more difficult time than ever seen before. Therefore, the need for publishers to diversify their revenue strategy has become more important than ever! In this article, we will explore the concept of revenue diversification and give you some practical tips on how you can implement it in your own business. Ad revenues have plummeted, putting pressure on publishers to diversify their revenue streams and come up with new and creative ways to monetize their business As the digital publishing industry continues to grow and evolve, it’s become increasingly important for publishers to diversify their revenue streams. With ad revenues in decline and competition increasing many publishers are looking at different ways of making money with their content. The success of any strategy depends on the right measurements The first step is to know what the metrics to track are and how to measure those effectively. If you don't know what those are, it's important to find out before starting a new revenue diversification strategy. In our experience many revenue diversification strategies often fail because they're not properly aligned with business goals or do not provide value for readers. For example, if your goal is to increase mobile traffic, you may decide that embedding an Amazon product carousel on your site could do this for you. But if this does not align with your brand or readers interests, then their engagement will suffer as it worsens the user experience and they'll go elsewhere—or close their browser altogether! At Spiny we strongly recommend focusing on revenue analytics, such as eCPM’s and breaking these down by content type. Tracking what is effective Another important step in the process is tracking what's effective. Digital publishers need a way to measure success, and analytics is the backbone of any modern strategy. You should be tracking a variety of metrics—including traffic sources, engagement time per article and what content your audience engages with most—so that you can determine which channels are working best and focus on them in future campaigns. For example, if you're using Facebook ads to drive more readership to your website or app (which many digital publishers do), then it's essential that you track data over time so that you know how much revenue each campaign generates for your business. It is also important to do this by category so you can assess which channels are providing the most ROI and where the majority of your growth is Originating. Publishers can utilize content analytics tools to help to track these things. It helps digital publishers understand what content is most engaging and where their audience comes from—critical information for understanding their users' behavior patterns so they can make informed decisions about how to grow their revenue by diversifying into new revenue streams. However, most content analytics tools fall short as they are limited to generalized metrics such as pageviews from tools adaptable to different business types. These tools miss the key metrics for digital publishers, revenue. More specifically RPMs, eCPMs and breaking these down by source. Live tracking is also notoriously difficult through most content analytics tools. Spiny.ai bucks this trend. As Spiny focuses on providing digital publishers with the most relevant information, live. Spiny removes misleading metrics that other content analytics tools can’t, such as page views. This is a common problem as solely relying on PVs can provide false data without revenue. Readers may be clicking onto an article from a misleading ad or posting but not staying around, not providing revenue and just providing false data. With Spiny you can make informed decisions about how to grow their revenue by diversifying into new revenue streams (e.g., live events). Analytics is the backbone of any meaningful strategy The first and most important part of any revenue diversification strategy is analytics . In fact, it’s the backbone of any meaningful strategy and should be considered before you choose your KPIs or content targets to optimize for. Analyzing your existing revenue streams can tell you a lot about what works and what doesn’t, which will help inform future decisions about how to grow your business. It also helps you maximize current revenues by finding areas that generate high value but aren't being maximized enough (like subscriptions), or identifying underperforming parts of your business (such as display ads). Maximize your current revenue streams To maximize your existing revenue streams, you’ll need to focus on the most profitable ones and optimize them. The first step is to understand what data you currently have on the effectiveness of each of your advertising channels and how it impacts your bottom line. Once you know which channels are most successful, use AI and machine learning to optimize them further. For example, if one ad network performs better than another in terms of clicks or conversions per dollar spent but costs more money overall, it could be worth switching over to that network if there’s enough traffic coming through it for you to justify spending more money there (or vice versa). With all this in mind, let's look at some specific tactics that can help digital publishers maximize their existing revenue streams: Choose KPIs wisely when analysing your content performance after implementation of a new strategy; otherwise you may be making decisions that end up costing you money Choose KPIs wisely when analyzing your content performance after implementation of a new strategy; otherwise you may be making decisions that end up costing you money. The best approach is to use KPIs that are relevant to your business, easy to measure and avoid using general KPIs. For example, a publisher might want to increase the number of subscribers they have so they can generate more revenue from advertising on their site or in their app. So one way of measuring how successful this strategy was would be by looking at how many email addresses were sent out during the campaign period, or what percentage increase there was in subscriptions compared with previous months/years etc. If instead the publisher looked at total number of downloads across all apps within X amount of time (where X could represent any period), then it wouldn't tell us anything about whether our strategy worked because we're not comparing apples with apples here - we're comparing apples with oranges! The challenge with data is that while it can provide insights, it needs the intelligence of the human mind to translate those insights into actions that will create value for the publisher Data is like water; it's essential for life, but it can be dangerous if you have too much of it. In the case of digital publishers, data represents the fuel that powers their business. But what if you have so much information flowing through your organization that even your most capable employees are overwhelmed? The challenge with data is that while it can provide insights, it needs the intelligence of the human mind to translate those insights into actions that will create value for the publisher. Data scientists often lack experience in translating their findings into actionable outcomes and tactics—and this is where Spiny.ai comes in. We combine AI technology with great human expertise so our clients benefit from powerful insights without being overwhelmed by them. A major challenge in optimizing content for monetization is determining which pieces of content actually bring in revenue A major challenge in optimizing content for monetization is determining which pieces of content actually bring in revenue. This can be difficult, as it's hard to tell which pieces are working and which aren't. If you want to make the most of your digital publishing business, you need to figure out what works and what doesn't, then measure the performance of each piece so that you can tell what content is working well and what isn't. In this section, we'll dive into how digital publishers can measure their content performance. A crucial breakthrough for publishers was the advent of native advertising, which is clearly separate from editorial content, does not interfere with user experience, and is geared specifically toward audiences most likely to convert into customers Native advertising is quickly becoming the most popular form of online advertising. It's content that is clearly separate from editorial content, does not interfere with user experience and is geared specifically toward audiences most likely to convert into customers. For example, if a publisher’s readers are mostly interested in travel and fashion, then an advertiser who sells luxury travel clothing will buy ads on the publisher’s website that match these criteria. This way they know their ad dollars are being spent wisely because they are being directed at an audience that wants what they sell. Publishers need solutions that integrate seamlessly with their existing tech stack, so they don't have to deal with multiple channels or even multiple systems within each channel When you're looking for a revenue diversification solution, there are several things you need to consider. First, it's essential to integrate the product seamlessly into your current tech stack. If you're already using analytics software or ad management tools, make sure that these systems can talk to each other in real time so that you don't have to switch between multiple channels and systems when making changes. This will save you time and money by reducing errors and increasing efficiency across all areas of your business. Secondarily, look for products that are easy-to-use—you don't want something so complicated that it takes up too much of your time or energy when figuring out how everything works together. If you want your revenue diversification strategies to be successful, you need analytics that can tell you what's working and what isn't working so you can improve your strategy as you go along To ensure that your revenue diversification strategies are successful, it's important to have a tool like Spiny’s BidRoll that will help you identify the best KPIs to focus on and the content most effective at generating revenue. Spiny’s BidRoll is an ad revenue increasing tool that allows publishers to track what works and what doesn't in real time. It also provides solutions and recommendations based on current performance so publishers can focus on content creation. Conclusion Digital publishers need more than just an ad revenue stream that keeps them afloat. They need a strategy that will keep them competitive in today's market, and this means diversifying their revenue streams beyond just advertising. If you want a free consultation with an industry expert about your revenue diversification strategy contact Spiny today .

Article

Spiny.ai emerges from beta to make AI accessible for digital publishers

Rohan Bedi / 2022-10-19

Raises $2.5 million from Nashville Capital Network and other investors 19th October 2022, Nashville, Tennessee-- Spiny.ai (Spiny), an innovative content analytics, publisher intelligence, and advertising technology provider announced today that they had emerged from beta for a global product launch. The artificial intelligence (AI) powered digital publishing platform is currently used by a group of anchor customers that includes On3 Media, Outsider.com, and Leaders.com. Spiny also announced it has raised $2.5 million in venture capital from Nashville Capital Network (NCN) and others. Spiny’s platform enables digital publishers to manage and scale their businesses more effectively. Through Spiny’s use of artificial intelligence and advanced analytics, publishers now have a single platform to understand their audience, define their content strategy, manage editorial teams, and optimize revenue growth. Spiny also offers a programmatic advertising solution known as BidRoll, which allows digital publishers to better monetize their content, with minimal ad operations resources required. Spiny was founded by Nana B. Nyantekyi, Shannon Terry, and Andrew Johnson, who have significant experience in digital publishing including roles with CBS Sports, Rivals.com, 247Sports, and Comicbook.com. Nana B. Nyantekyi will serve as CEO of Spiny.ai and brings his wealth of experience in data and business intelligence to leading the company. “Traditional approaches to building digital publishing assets are expensive and cumbersome, especially when it comes to understanding user behavior, revenue generation, and editorial performance,” says Nyantekyi. “Spiny was born out of our frustrations running publishing companies, where growth was achieved with large technical teams and complex technologies. The current tools on the market primarily focus on content and editorial analytics. We felt there was a need to develop a product that ties together all the core pillars of digital publishing - audience, editorial, and revenue. Now with Spiny, digital publishers, large and small, have a tool that provides a full 360-degree view of what a publisher needs to grow sustainably, maximize revenue and make effective real-time decisions.” Software and operational tools have helped digital publishers in recent years, however, compared to other industries, such as advertising and marketing, there has been a lack of specialized tools to support digital publishers. The $550 billion industry is rapidly growing, with a CAGR of 12% according to the AP. Businesses are witnessing shifts in operations, audiences, and monetization strategies as they continue to move from traditional media to digital platforms. Publishers are eager for data solutions and software to accelerate growth and maximize revenue without the large technical overheads. To finance the rapid growth of the company, Spiny announced its first institutional round of funding led by Nashville Capital Network (NCN). The injection of capital will allow Spiny to grow its team and build out key product features, such as subscription analytics and multi-media tools. “The team at Spiny recognized the need for innovation in digital publishing. We thought they were the ideal team to tackle the constantly changing landscape impacting the industry, namely first-party data, content monetization, and audience growth. The Spiny team lived it as publishers and they understand the need for tools to manage publishing assets,” said Sid Chambless, Managing Partner of NCN. “We are pleased to partner with Nana, Shannon, and Andy to solve this problem.” Spiny has been revolutionary for both midmarket and enterprise operators. Will Crall of On3.com, the fastest-growing sports publisher in the US, has seen the impact of implementing Spiny. “Spiny allows me to easily visualize our company's performance in real-time. Instead of opening multiple software tools, I have everything I need to manage and make decisions in one place. I've been extremely impressed with the Spiny team. They have made numerous improvements and customizations to the software to fit our specific needs,” said Crall. Brandon O’Neal, VP of Monetization, Ads, and Products at On3.com said, “Revenue managers, Ad-Ops teams, and business intelligence leaders will all be more efficient and effective at monetizing content with the assistance of Spiny. Its ability to use machine learning for monitoring and anomaly detection ensures that we do not lose revenue due to poor ad bidder performance or broken ad units for example - all this in addition to the upside it creates via its BidRoll ad monetization product.” About Spiny Spiny is a leading content analytics, publisher intelligence, and ad revenue generation tool for digital publishers. Through Spiny, content creators have access to best-in-class software proven to increase operational efficiency and drive greater revenue. By providing effective author management tools, audience analytics, ad revenue generation via BidRoll, and more, digital publishers can manage and scale their business with just one platform. To learn more about Spiny visit us at https://spiny.ai About Nashville Capital Network NCN is a partnership of more than 100 professional investors, most of whom have been founders and executives of highly successful companies. By leveraging the experience and expertise of the individuals within its partnership, NCN is able to identify, develop, and support promising, high-growth companies. NCN manages multiple venture capital funds including NCN Angel Fund I, NCN Angel Fund II, Tennessee Angel Fund, NCN Partners Fund, and NCN Fund IV. For more information on NCN, please visit nashvillecapital.com. Contact: Rohan Bedi Spiny.ai info@spiny.ai 615-437-8574

Article

Importance of Real Time Content Analysis for Media Companies

Valeria Zaltur / 2022-10-11

Table of Contents: Real-time content analysis Benefits of using real-time content analysis Promotional strategies Performance optimisation Reader engagement Relevant trends for your audience How to find the best software tool Data Analytics The tool that offers real time-data Audience segmentation Ease of use Spiny.ai is the perfect choice Conclusion Real-time content analysis is essential for any brand that wants to stay ahead of the curve. The ability to quickly analyse your audience’s preferences and habits will help you create relevant content and tailor it to the target audience. It doesn’t matter if you are a large company or a small business, real-time data analytics can help improve productivity and profitability. Real-time content analysis Real-time content analysis allows you to see what is happening with your content as it is happening, and it can tell you whether or not your content is performing well. It can help you improve how you manage, measure, and distribute the information on your website or social media pages by giving instant feedback about how users are interacting with that information. This type of analysis also gives insight into what types of posts perform best—for example, if people tend to like certain posts more than others—so that companies can produce more of those types of posts in the future. Benefits of using real-time content analysis Real-time content analysis is an important part of understanding how your audience is engaging with your content. With historical analytics, you're limited to looking at things based on a specific date range. You can't see how different headlines perform over time, or how one article performs compared to another—and this is especially important in today's world where social media newsfeeds change constantly. Real-time analytics tools allow you to understand what content is most popular right now and which articles are trending well on social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, or websites and blogs. You can also use these tools to see if certain topics are gaining traction across the web so that you can write more about them or create new products that align with these trends. Promotional strategies Real-time content analysis helps you to identify the right content to promote. Firstly, it helps you in identifying the type of content your audience is interested in, which makes it easier for you to create relevant and tailored promotional strategies for them. Secondly, it also helps you identify what kind of content is performing well on your website and blogs so that you can promote it further on different platforms such as social media or emails. Thirdly and most importantly, real-time analytics can help you find out what kind of articles are getting shared on other websites (for example LinkedIn) and by who. This way, it's possible to see who shared that content and the audience that engages with it. Performance optimisation Real-time content analysis helps you to understand content performance. It provides insights into how users are interacting with your blogs and see which performs well. This can help you to make adjustments as soon as they’re needed. By taking on this feedback, you can quickly promote the content that seems to be well-liked and equally, make changes when the audience sees something wrong with your article. Reader engagement Engagement is a measure of how much a user is interacting with your content—like reading comments, replying to them (on social media, email or other channels), and sharing your articles on various platforms. You can use this metric to track reader engagement across all of your channels and find out what types of stories are most engaging for readers in different areas—and where there might be room for improvement. This can help you better tailor the kind of content that you produce in the future. Social media is a great way to reach out to your audience. You can promote content on Facebook, Twitter, or any other platform in real-time by replying to comments and sharing posts that people share with you. Relevant trends for your audience The first step in your content planning is identifying relevant trends for your audience. Trends are important because they can give you insight into the market, the industry and even your business. This means that trends aren't always obvious, they aren't always related to your content and they're not always related to a specific topic or industry. There are many different types of trends as well: Popularity—what's trending on social media New technologies—if people are excited about something new then it probably has some potential for you too! Market demand- what are people looking for? It may be a new product or service but should be related to your business. This can help inform your marketing strategy. How to find the best software tool When you're looking for the best software tool for your company, there are a few things you should know about. First, there are different kinds of software tools. Some are designed specifically for media companies and others aren't as robust and can be used across multiple industries. Second, it's important to know what kind of data you want to analyze with this new tool before deciding on one. Do you want to analyze how many people read your articles? Or how long do they stay on each page? Or maybe even what percentage of readers shared an article on social media? Data Analytics Data analytics are important for any business, especially in media. Media companies have a lot of data that they can collect from their users, but this data doesn't tell them everything about what their customers think or feel. They need more in-depth information about their business if they want to be successful. There are several metrics you should look for when investing in a data analytics solution: engagement time and conversion rate are two examples of what you should be looking at when searching for an analytics solution. These numbers will help you understand how your content is resonating with your audience, which content types are most popular and how long people stay on your website before leaving (or converting). It's also important that the analytics program offers easy-to-understand reports so that anyone who needs access can easily make sense of them—this could mean incorporating more than one person into the decision-making process or finding tools like Spiny.ai which provide all this information as well as customer tracking and segmentation capabilities. The tool that offers real time-data Real-time data is the primary focus for media companies, and it’s important that the tools you use to support this. It's worth having a look at Spiny.ai, a platform that provides real-time data dashboard, article performance, shares, conversions, segmentation and recommendations in one place. Audience segmentation Audience segmentation is the process of dividing a large audience into smaller, more manageable groups. It helps you to understand your audience better and allows you to target them more effectively. Segmentation will help in identifying which segments have the highest propensity to buy or subscribe. You can then focus on these segments while developing content and marketing plans, therefore investing in an analysis tool that offers this for your business. Ease of use The user interface should be easy to use, navigate and understand. The easier it is to use a platform, the quicker and easier people will learn how to use it and benefit from it in the day to day activities. Spiny.ai is the perfect choice Spiny.ai is the ideal real-time content analysis tool for media companies because it provides data analytics in addition to audience segmentation, ease of use and a business analytics tool that presents, monitors and analyzes all of this information in one place. Spiny has been providing innovative solutions to publishers since 2020 with BidRoll - an ad revenue-increasing tool that allows publishers to track what works and what doesn't in real-time. Allowing you access to this kind of detailed information about your content will help keep you ahead of the curve by helping you understand how your readers engage with the content they consume through reading habits or social sharing behaviour. This can help inform future decisions such as which type of stories should be covered more often or whether certain topics need more coverage from other writers who specialize in those areas. Having access to these insights will also allow them to make better decisions about where their resources should go based on what readers are most interested in reading about at any given time. Conclusion In conclusion, real-time content analysis can be a powerful tool when it comes to improving your social media marketing strategy. With Spiny.ai, you’ll be able to easily analyze your audience, understand what they like and dislike about your content, and use this information for future optimization purposes. The best part is that the platform offers all of these features on one platform – no need for multiple tools or subscriptions!

Article

How to Properly Manage an Editorial Team

Valeria Zaltur / 2022-10-11

There's no doubt that managing an editorial team is a challenging job. To execute on your content strategy, you have to have the right people on your team to generate relevant content, but also keep them motivated and productive. It can be easy to fall into patterns of author management that either doesn't work or do more harm than good. Here are some tips for how you can manage your editorial team better. Contents: Get a handle on each team member's skills Identify high and low performers Set up a code of conduct Demand accountability Require regular weekly check-ins Be clear about your goals, and the objectives that need to be met in order for those goals to be reached Tracking output and performance Weigh reporting speed and accuracy equally Create a system for the most frequent errors you see editors make - be relentless in addressing these errors with your staff as soon as you see them The most effective way to manage an editorial team is to make sure everyone knows how their work benefits their team, your business, and the readers you serve Conclusion Get a handle on each team member's skills If you're a manager, one of the most important things you can do is get a handle on each team member's skills. Not only does this help you understand how best to utilize the talent within your department, but it also helps with delegating tasks and streamlining workflow. For example, if someone has an incredible ability to organize information but isn't very skilled at writing or designing graphics, don't put them in charge of projects that require those skills. Instead, try assigning them research-based tasks that require their organizational strengths while also allowing them opportunities to contribute creatively through other means (such as by helping with brainstorming sessions). In addition to learning about each person's strengths and weaknesses—including any potential blind spots—you should also consider how these assets can be used by others on the team. For example: What kind of project would benefit from having someone who excels at time management? Or what kind of project would benefit from having someone who has strong research skills? You'll likely find that there are several ways in which every employee can contribute value even if they don't have a background in editorial work per se; all it takes is some creative thinking! Identify high and low performers When managing editorial teams, it's important to know where your employees stand. Your goal is to identify high and low performers, so you can encourage the former to push for more and the latter to improve. To do this, consider how many stories an employee has published in the last quarter: Were they published on time? How many errors were in them? How long did it take for those errors to be corrected (if they were)? Set up a code of conduct While you're developing your editorial team's workflow, it's important to set up guidelines for behaviour. The following questions can help: How will we communicate? Email is often the best way to keep in touch, but there are other options as well (like Slack and Skype). How will we handle editorial disputes? In cases where two people disagree on something, what process should they follow to come to an agreement or determine who gets the final say? What sort of language should be used when talking about clients and their brands? This is especially critical if you're working with sensitive topics like politics or religion—you don't want anyone feeling uncomfortable or offended by how things are said at work! Demand accountability Now that you have a team in place, it's time to make sure they're on the same page. As the editor-in-chief of your publication, it is your job to demand accountability from everyone on your team. You want them all to be responsible for their work and deadlines. You may also want to consider implementing some sort of bonus or commission structure so that employees are incentivised to do better work (and therefore deliver faster). At the end of each month, review performance metrics with each member of your staff so that all parties understand exactly where everyone stands and where improvements need to be made moving forward. Require regular weekly check-ins Your editorial team will only meet regularly if you make it mandatory. You don't want to give editors the option of skipping a meeting once in a while, and neither do you want to force them to attend every time. Set up a recurring weekly check-in schedule (e.g., every Thursday at 9 am), then stick to it. Your weekly check-ins should be short and sweet—even if they are weekly! If an editor has an issue, they can bring it up during this week's meeting, but most issues can wait until next week's meeting (and some issues aren't worth addressing at all). For example: A senior editor might have a problem with one of the articles from last month's issue; instead of bringing this problem up during the five-minute weekly meeting, he might want to send an email about the issue first so that his junior colleague has enough time and space to respond thoughtfully before their next meeting together. Be clear about your goals, and the objectives that need to be met in order for those goals to be reached Your objective should be SMART: specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and timely. This will help ensure that everyone on the team understands what success looks like and how much work needs to be done for that success to happen. Tracking output and performance As you manage your team, the first thing to do is track their productivity. You can use Spiny's editorial tracking feature to make sure that your editors are keeping up with deadlines and producing a consistent quality of work. The sheet should include the following information: The name of the editor The number of articles they wrote The number of articles they edited The number of articles they published The revenue they brought in (if applicable) You will also want to keep track of any errors in their work so that you can improve on this going forward. Weigh reporting speed and accuracy equally As you prepare to manage an editorial team, you must weigh reporting speed and accuracy equally. While speed is certainly important, it’s also imperative that any content you publish is accurate. As editor-in-chief, you must make sure your writers are aware of this balance, so they can prioritize each other's needs accordingly: Accuracy should come first when reporting on breaking news or developing stories. Speed comes second—you want to get the facts right before publishing them. You also want to be as transparent as possible with readers about how long it takes for updates in these situations. It could be hours (or days) until you know what happened; you're working around the clock to gather information from your sources so that you can share what you know at that moment with everyone else who wants answers too! Accuracy should come first when providing commentary or analysis on a current situation where there isn't many hard data yet—or when writing about something that has been well-covered by other outlets but where new information has come out since then. Speed should come first for lighter articles like opinion pieces and entertainment/lifestyle coverage because there's less risk of getting things wrong here; if someone disagrees with something said in one of those pieces then chances are they won't mind waiting another day or two while you get another perspective from someone else who does agree with you instead! Create a system for the most frequent errors you see editors make - be relentless in addressing these errors with your staff as soon as you see them You know what you need to do, but how can you get your staff to follow the rules? Your editors must understand what is expected of them and how it will benefit them. A clear process isn't just a good idea—it's necessary. Your team needs to know who is responsible for what, and when they're supposed to be doing it. You should also clearly communicate when things aren't being done correctly or on time. If an editor doesn't meet their deadlines for one assignment, lay out in detail exactly why this is unacceptable and let them know that future assignments will be affected if they continue making the same mistakes. The most effective way to manage an editorial team is to make sure everyone knows how their work benefits their team, your business, and the readers you serve The most effective way to manage an editorial team is to make sure everyone knows how their work benefits their team, your business, and the readers you serve. By communicating this information as clearly and often as possible, you can help keep your editorial staff motivated and productive. Here are some ways you can accomplish this: Showcase the impact of great content with tools like Spiny.ai. Spiny will provide data that shows how many people visit certain pages on your website each day, how long they spend reading them, which search phrases they used to find those particular pages, whether they took action after visiting (such as signing up for a newsletter), etc., all in real-time. This information can help reinforce the value of high-quality content by showing its direct impact on traffic increases or conversions (e.g., sales). Weekly meeting with all employees to ensure everyone is on the same page and up to date on what’s being worked on Use surveys to gather feedback from readers about what they like about your site's articles/posts/etc., what works well but could be improved upon—and why! Conclusion Editorial teams are an integral part of the publishing process. If you're thinking about starting one, or if you already have one in place, these tips can help you manage it effectively so that you can work more efficiently and effectively.

Article

Don't fear the bot!

Nana Owusu-Nyantekyi / 2022-09-26

In the infamous words of Benjamin Franklin, “In this world, nothing can be said to be certain except death, taxes [and more data]”. Today’s world is awash with data, which, if used wisely, can uncover meaningful information, drive business predictions and enhance decision-making. As data has drifted into the mainstream over the last couple of decades, new roles, including business intelligence analyst, data visualisation specialist and data scientist, to name a few, have become fundamental to organisations. All were created to mine the value lurking in business data from customers, products, advertising and social media sources. Such is the opportunity to get ahead of competitors by leveraging data. The Economist published this article in 2017 naming data as the oil of the digital era. But unlike oil, the availability of data that can be consumed looks set to only increase with each passing day. Datanewoil.jpeg Mo Data, Mo Problems My first foray into the data analytics world began at a digital media start-up where I was quickly tasked with the responsibility of mining the data for insights and reporting on the overall health of the business. It was exciting to watch the data reporting processes evolve from the typical Excel, CSV and PDF formats to the use of interactive and self-service analytics dashboards. As the value of data became more apparent, so did the demand from the editorial, marketing, subscriptions, ad operations and executive teams to utilise their data. My to-do list soon felt like a never-ending landslide of requests for ad-hoc analysis and routine reports, which at times made me feel like the bottleneck to the progress of the business. My experience there was enlightening and quickly made me aware of some valuable lessons: Data is fragmented, making fully-formed insights difficult Like many fast-growing businesses, we were no different in that the data from the various departments was stored in silos with no central database to query. In addition to my laptop becoming a dumping ground for CSV files, it made it increasingly challenging for me to understand why certain trends were occurring. I would often see a decline in eCPMs on a given day without knowing that the cause was a faulty ad unit due to a code update on the site by the dev team. It would be easy to chalk that day off as just a bad day for ad spend instead. Yet another dashboard that gets no love. With the increase of requests for analysis, I soon found that I was making my dashboards with tons of filters to try and please every stakeholder, which led to no one finding that the dashboard fitted their exact needs. Furthermore, it was disheartening to see yet another dashboard I had spent hours trying to make user friendly and engaging receive hardly any views after its initial deployment while still getting questions in my inbox, which the dashboard already had the answers to. Cleaning data and writing reports take forever! As exciting as this new world of being a data scientist sounds, the reality is that analysts spend the majority of their time cleaning and transforming their data into a format that can be read for analysis. Once you have finally taken a deep dive into your insights, then comes the crucial stage of communicating it effectively. My Mondays were typically filled with weekly performance reviews and crafting each email would easily take me close to an hour or more. To compound things, it was always frustrating when I saw I had left in a number or forgot to change a data point in my edits from the previous version of the report. Pie-chart.png Never fear, the AI is here! The Knowledge Project With Shane Parrish podcast episode with AI expert Pedro Domingos discussed “The Rise of The Machines” and tackled an interesting topic about how white collar jobs are easier to replace blue collar jobs. For many current and former analysts like myself, that may sound like a major threat to our livelihoods, but I would highly recommend giving it a listen. It covers the important concept of how AI can be used to empower human workers rather than replace them. It was in this vein that my co-founders and I decided to start Spiny.ai. Our smart Publisher Intelligence (PI) sidekick, nicknamed Pliny the Editor, enables publishing business to create data-conscious organisations by empowering each individual to become a data storyteller within their own function. Our experience in the publishing industry taught us the value of storytelling and the timely delivery of pieces. Building on that knowledge and through the use of natural language generation (NLG) techniques, Pliny creates narratives from data and delivers it in a quick easy-to-digest, bitesize fashion. As we’ve deemed it important with all new emerging technologies, our PI keeps humans in the loop by enabling them to craft their own stories through selecting the metrics they are most interested in and being able to add more context to Pliny’s automatically generated data stories. As such, the way organisations report their data and insights should be narrative-driven. Pliny accelerates this transition by increasing the speed, contextualisation and tweet-like delivery of the insights. How Pliny can make analysts (and non-data employees) even better at their role: As previously mentioned, a large majority of the time, data needs to be retrieved, cleaned and transformed before any insights can be gleaned. Pliny automates this process, finding the right insights that need to be investigated from the various streams of data and automatically begins generating the story. With the predictable side of the analyst role being automated, this leaves you more time to actually dig for meaningful insights or investigate what Pliny has already found for you. Stakeholders engaged far more when I built narratives around the trends visualised in my dashboards in a story-like format. The key distinction was that dashboards lacked the emotions that stories can convey, which are an essential part of the decision making process. With Pliny creating bite-size stories into a personalised timeline for each team, analysts can focus more on how they communicate these insights to different teams. Discovering that 60% of all sessions are from Facebook in a given month may seem like great news to the marketing team but not so great for the ad ops team who knows that Facebook sessions do not monetise as well as others on their site. The data analyst role is set to evolve into the data coach. Brent Dykes wrote a great piece for Forbes describing this concept. As data becomes democratised, the burden of business intelligence becomes a shared one, no longer resting solely on the shoulders of the business intelligence and data teams. Pliny’s format of creating bite-size data stories that can be consumed in a similar fashion to how we consume our Twitter, Apple News and Google News feeds creates a subconscious of data awareness in the business. With each member having the ability to understand data, the role of the analyst will be to help coach others to tell data stories and make impactful decisions, with Pliny in tow, aiding in the writing of these stories. With data now consumable by everyone in a centralised communication sphere, trust improves and the biases that can accompany data reports are mitigated. Better yet, each team member is focusing more on what actually drives value to their teams rather than spending time trying to answer head-scratching questions.

Article

Batman and (virtual) Robin: The Future of Work

Nana Owusu-Nyantekyi / 2022-09-26

The last few months have been incredibly challenging for all of us: mandatory lockdowns, the inability to spend time with loved ones, alarming rates of unemployment, an ailing global economy and an invisible enemy in the form of COVID-19. Still, this enforced timeout from my regular routine has not been all doom and gloom, and has given me an opportunity to take a fresh perspective on a lot of personal and business elements. A hot topic amid the global pandemic has been the future of the workplace. The necessity of a fixed office space has been thrown into question, along with the need for the extensive amounts of travel several people do for their work. Many companies have realised their staff are able to work from home (WFH) just as productively, if not more in some cases, as they would do in an office. This realisation has pushed some of the world’s largest companies to redefine company rules regarding remote work. Twitter announced that it would allow its employees to work from home “forever”, while Facebook stated that the company will permanently embrace remote work and believes that within the next 5–10 years, 50% of their workforce would be remote. Pretty astonishing when you realise that would mean 25,000 employees working remote — and that’s not even taking into account how much the company will grow in that time. Zoom’s meteoric rise during this pandemic, exemplified by its 169% revenue growth during the last quarter, is a sign of the times ahead. Telecommuting, video calls and virtual conferences will become a mainstay, but as exciting as this shift to working from home may be for some — who else has gone for the shirt with pyjamas bottoms look for a virtual meeting? ??‍♂️ — I have the feeling that the intangibles we gain by being in the same space may be lost. Although some may argue otherwise, the office offers spontaneity and serendipity. Hear me out. Ed Catmull, the president of Walt Disney, once said of the Disney offices: “Most buildings are designed for some technical purpose, but ours is structured to maximize inadvertent encounters”. This is a classic example of ‘idea flow’ in an organisation. BMW, Unilever and several other companies have cited the use of these practices in order to encourage chance encounters between employees so they can bounce ideas off one another, which have greatly increased innovation and productivity. I, for one, have had the fortune of a co-worker walk past my desk and instantly give me an idea to fix a problem I had been stuck on for hours. A crucial prerequisite for these happenstances to be valuable is information. Knowledge shared is knowledge squared, as the saying goes. As our work becomes more digital, though, we will inadvertently wall ourselves off from these chance encounters and information nuggets that our co-workers possess. Our interactions will inherently become more deliberate and less serendipitous. Some studies have shown that there is much to be gained from WFH. Employees tend to be more creative while telecommuting, which can increase the flow of ideas, but on the other hand, they perform poorly while doing dull tasks, such as data entry. The latter observation is important as in reality, it is a large part of many technical roles, but I believe we are on the cusp of a new wave of solutions. The AI-driven sidekick aka (virtual) Robin. Deloitte produced an article aptly named Looping in your new sidekick, where they pitted a team of analysts against an algorithm in a qualitative analysis “bake-off”. It was refreshing to see a perspective of AI not being worshipped as a genie that can grant a business any wish they so desired. Their findings showed that in many tasks, although the algorithm took roughly one-fifth of the time to finish, it struggled to perform the qualitative tasks as well as the humans, often misinterpreting the context and prioritising statistics over logic. The algorithm took home the wooden (baking) spoon. Where algorithms can excel are on quantitative and repetitive tasks — the very ones that remote workers find boring and tend to be less productive on. This sounds like a perfect union in our shift to remote work, where these AI assistants can take care of many of the dull tasks, allowing humans to slow down and be more logical and creative. “With the synergistic power of man and machine, qualitative research can be done more efficiently. By letting our human analysts and researchers slow down and be “more human,” the insights, recommendations, and value derived from qualitative research may exceed what has been achieved so far. We value and encourage firms to embrace their new technological sidekicks, but it is apparent that for data analysis we still need team human for their unique capabilities.” – Deloitte, Looping in your new sidekick The inclusion of humans for qualitative tasks will remain critical, but as a tag-team of human and machine, we may yet see new heights in work productivity.

Article

Why it's time publishers got their own AI

Nana Owusu-Nyantekyi / 2022-09-26

In recent years, artificial intelligence has begun to gain popularity again. But the concept of artificial intelligence is nothing new and has been around since 1956. If we pay careful attention, we see AI in products we use every day – Apple’s Siri is an AI assistant and even predictive text recommendations are a form of AI. The Oxford dictionary defines artificial intelligence as the following: “The theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks normally requiring human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages.” In short, an action that can be determined by a set of rules can be recreated by AI. It is taken a step further with Machine Learning where bots are able to come to conclusions on new challenges they have never encountered, based on previous experiences. We are seeing AIs appear in healthcare to aid doctors in their diagnosis of illnesses and more recently used to model potential genomes of the COVID-19 virus. In the workplace, AI is fast becoming a powerful tool to automate repetitive tasks or operate autonomous cars for deliveries. If harnessed in the correct fashion, AI is a tool to increase human productivity rather than be viewed as a threat to our wellbeing and livelihood. While AI has begun to supercharge certain industries, it appears that the publishing industry has been left lagging behind. Advertisers, on the other hand, have long used machine learning and AI algorithms to their advantage, allowing them to optimize their advertising spend and control the ad market. For publishers, access to complex technology has been far from democratic, which has hindered their ability to keep up with the modern wave of reporting and monetization of their audiences. At Spiny.ai, we’re looking to change the narrative and give publishers a seat at the table, thereby releasing them from their technical debt and giving them more time to focus on being creators. Creating a collective consciousness As with producing content, a contextual and historical perspective of the piece is critical. Yet publishers find it challenging to get the same holistic information on how their business is doing. Our Publisher Intelligence sidekick, Spiny, was developed to bridge this gap. Its intuition is a product of our team’s collective experiences (editorial, management, marketing, data science and ad operations) from the last three decades in the publishing industry. As its ‘sidekick’ role suggests, its purpose is to enhance human intuition, not replace it. Through our experiences, it became apparent that a team’s ability to work effectively was restricted when business information was scattered and the overarching goals lacked clarity, making their tasks seem narrow and mundane. Through Publisher Intelligence, teams are given a contextual understanding of the drivers of the business. As a result, they can move forward to execute their roles with purpose and, more importantly, the ability to adjust on the fly. General Stanley McChrystal, former commander of the U.S. Joint Special Operations Command, used to tell his troops: “If conditions on the ground are different from what was originally planned for and the order that was originally issued was wrong, execute the order that should have been issued.” Not the type of command you would typically expect to hear from a four-star army general. Yet, rooted in this philosophy is the need for shared consciousness of the tasks, goals and what success looks like. It’s time for publishers to do the same within their businesses and leverage the power of AI to create a collective consciousness, enabling the delivery of pitch-perfect messages.

Article

Spiny.ai Origins: The hedgehog and the Fox

Nana Owusu-Nyantekyi / 2022-09-26

We founded Spiny.ai on the basis of the Hedgehog concept. The term stems from the ancient Greek parable that states “The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.” The philosopher Isiah Berlin, built on this idea in his essay aptly titled “The Hedgehog and the Fox” where he divided some of the world’s best writers and philosophers into two groups, hedgehogs and foxes. He described hedgehogs as those “who relate everything to a single central vision” and foxes as those “those who pursue many ends”. “Berlin considered Shakespeare and Aristotle to be foxes but Plato and Friedrich Nietzsche were hedgehogs.” But given their perceived standings in the animal kingdom, it is interesting that Berlin considers hedgehogs as being in some ways superior to foxes. Hedgehogs have generally been perceived as cute little furry animals and I imagine if the question was posed – would you rather be a hedgehog or a fox? – most would choose a fox. After all, foxes are known for the stunning red coats and for being sly and smart, while hedgehogs, on the other hand, are not typically seen as beacons of authority or reverence in the animal kingdom. Yet, when the fox tries to hunt the hedgehog with all its cunning tricks and plots, the hedgehog reverts back to its one world-class ability: defending itself. Hedgehogs roll into a ball exposing their prickly spines (also known as quills) making touching them a rather unpleasant experience. It is this singular focus and ability that became the cornerstone of Spiny.ai. Our one big thing (and what we believe we can be the best at) is publishing! From that singular focus, our overarching goal of providing Solutions for Publishers, INventory and Yield (SPINY) was born – not just a cool nickname for a hedgehog. We did toy around with naming our company Hedgehog.ai but after delving into Jim Collins’ book – Good to Great – we realised that the hedgehog concept is more about comprehension rather than ownership. We understood that the hedgehog concept should not be owned but rather be shared so others can decipher what their guiding principle is for their company. Our mission is to create collective consciousness in publishing organisations to enable them to deliver pitch-perfect messages. Our three tenets in how we are redefining business intelligence reporting for publishers are speed, communication and publishing intelligence. At the intersection of these three sit our passion and expertise to build an artificial intelligence assistant for media brands. spiny-concept.png “Fun fact: For the data buffs out there, a group of hedgehogs is known as an ‘array’ – quite fitting to Spiny.ai’s DNA if you ask me!”